Tag Archives: panic attacks



We are most often our own worst critics. When we have a low sense of self-worth we feel that nothing we ever do is right, good enough or pleasing for others. If we sing we feel we are off tune; if we socialize and laugh at a joke we feel we laughed to loud; when we get brave enough to do a task such as bake cookies for another person, we claim we are bad at cooking and predict the cookies will be terrible.  We devalue our talents, and actions and what we produce. We self-doubt, and negatively predict negative criticism so that when it comes to us, we are in some way hurt less. Which never is the case, for most certainly someone will fulfill our self-damming prophecies resulting in inner pain and another broken block in our self- esteem wall.

Criticisms or perceived criticism causes great inner pain, feelings of being stabbed in the back, betrayed, let down, depleted of joyful feelings or experiences, down cast, sadden and even brought low to depressive feelings.

** What is one of the earliest criticisms that you can remember and whom did it come from?

** What is the result of this criticism?

** Did you in anyway allow the criticism to affect your life, goals, hopes or dreams?

** What message did you get that you have believed about yourself from this criticism early in your life?

** Have you ever challenged this criticism in your life, if so how and what is the result?

**Have you had a recent negative experience of criticism, if so how has it affected you recently?

Is There a Link Between Emotional Eating and Anxiety?

Is There a Link Between Emotional Eating and Anxiety?

Stephanie Dodier, a former fortune 500 company executive learned that her
poor health, and panic attacks were linked to her habitual emotional eating. In
the article attached by link below she share her story of a life of emotional
eating, anxiety and panic attacks. When she learned to deal with her past
unresolved issues, she also learned how to manage her emotional eating habits.
This led to losing 100 pounds and changing her high powered career to become a
health and nutrition specialist and educator. Her article below shares with
readers not just her testimony about losing 100 pounds but great insight about
diets and wellness. It is well worth reading.

In a WebMD article called  “Emotional
Eating What Helps” the authors lists suggestions on how to control emotional
eating. They suggest the following:

Be kind to yourself.

Make a list of stresses in your life and plans to
resolve these stresses. I would add seek counseling to learn better stress
management and how better to deal with the unresolved issues of the past. I
would encourage any person who identifies stress as a cause for the poor health
and emotional eating to investigate how EEG Neurofeedback can help elevate
anxiety.  See my other article: What is

Pause yourself before eating. WebMD says to take a few
minutes to let the impulse to eat when you’re not really hungry, go away.  In this moment of pause you could challenge
yourself to change your activity, or increase your activity if you are bored or
feeling sad feeling.  You can reflect on
what might be a healthy choice, or seek out someone to talk to.

For personal insight from an expert who
personally experienced emotional eating its consequences click on the link
below and learn how Stephanie Dodier overcame emotional eating and panic



87: How to Stop Emotional Eating (From a Nutritionist Who Lost 100 Pounds!)

We’ve all been there. It’s midnight, we’re up late, and suddenly hunger strikes … for chocolate! But can craving chocolate really be hunger, or is it just emotional eating? It’s pretty easy to guess the answer. Emotional eating wrecks our healthy eat – source